Defense Date

Spring 3-15-2017

Availability

One-year Embargo

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

PhD

Department

Nursing

School

School of Nursing

Committee Chair

Rick Zoucha

Committee Member

Carolyn Nickerson

Committee Member

Jana Lauderdale

Keywords

African Americans, ethnonursing, focus groups, military, prenatal care, women

Abstract

Introduction: The military health system (MHS) offers prenatal care at no-cost, but African-American women eligible for prenatal care still have low/no/late utilization. No studies have sought to understand factors that influence African American women’s use of early and continuous prenatal care or their perceptions of the care they received in the military health care system. The purpose of this research was to understand how African American women in the MHS perceived their care during the prenatal period. Methodology: An ethnonursing study was conducted in two military treatment facilities. The sample comprised 21 informants. Findings: Leininger’s Four Phases of Ethnonursing Data Analysis revealed three themes: (a) African American military women in the MHS have positive prenatal care (PNC) experiences when psychosocial and informational support is given by trusted and familiar sources, (b) Health care, financial, prenatal, and educational resources are valued components for taking care of self and preparing for baby, and (c) Emotional and instrumental support from expectant fathers, family, friends, and the military reinforced PNC beliefs, decreased maternal stress, and promoted expectant fathers’ participation in PNC. Discussion: Women experienced positive prenatal care experiences when they had continuity of care and a circle of support. Recommendations for care that is culturally congruent and future studies are offered.

Format

PDF

Language

English

Available for download on Saturday, May 12, 2018

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