Defense Date

7-24-2006

Availability

Worldwide Access

Submission Type

thesis

Degree Name

MA

Department

Graduate Center for Social and Public Policy

School

McAnulty College and Graduate School of Liberal Arts

Committee Chair

Norman Conti

Committee Member

Douglas Harper

Keywords

Decision-making, Eldercare

Abstract

Utilizing the sociology of knowledge perspective, as well as elements of structural-functional theory this study examined the decision-making process as it relates to eldercare. Specifically, how does the knowledge of available resources, community context, and caregiving beliefs affect the caregiving alternative one chooses? Furthermore, what role does family social milieus play in the decision-making process? This research used a 20-item interview schedule developed specifically for this study; and the unit of analysis was the individual responsible for making decisions about the care received by an elder. The survey used both closed and open-ended questions, designed to capture data related to the cultural, socio-demographic, and social structural level of each respondent. Thirty-three (33) individuals responsible for eldercare decision-making completed an interview, which took anywhere from 45 minutes to 2 hours to complete. Data from closed ended questions were coded and entered into an SPSS file. The data from open-ended questions were summarized on a case-by-case basis and the content analyzed for particular themes or patterns that could be measured. Finding from this study, as well as policy recommendations are discussed, concentrating on social service agencies, medical organizational resources, public education as it relates to social and medical agencies, and economic and medical dilemmas effecting decision-makers.

Format

PDF

Language

English

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