Defense Date

Spring 3-17-2017

Availability

Immediate Access

Submission Type

dissertation

Degree Name

EdD

Department

Instructional Technology (EdDIT)

School

School of Education

Committee Chair

David D. Carbonara

Committee Member

Launcelot Brown

Committee Member

Deborah Scigliano

Keywords

self-efficacy, interaction, student satisfaction, perceived learning

Abstract

This study aimed to explore the relationship between four predictor variables (online learning self-efficacy, learner-content interaction, learner-instructor interaction, and learner-learner interaction) and student satisfaction and perceived learning. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent to which the four variables are predictive of student satisfaction and perceived learning. A total of 167 students completed the survey; the survey assessed self-efficacy for completing an online course, interaction with the content, interaction with the course instructor, interaction with other students, student satisfaction, and perceived learning within an online learning environment. The independent variables were self-efficacy, learner-content interaction, learner-instructor interaction, and learner-learner interaction. The dependent variables were student satisfaction and perceived learning.

Results show that the model with the three predictor variables of interaction (learner-content interaction, learner-instructor interaction, and learner-learner interaction) significantly predicts student satisfaction and perceived learning. Self-efficacy explains 3.5% of student satisfaction and 6.5% of perceived learning above and beyond what is already explained by the other three predictor variables of interaction. The overall model with the four independent variables of interaction (self-efficacy, learner-content interaction, learner-instructor interaction, and learner-learner interaction) significantly predicts student satisfaction and perceived learning. Learner-content interaction was the strongest and most significant predictor of student satisfaction, where self-efficacy was the strongest and most significant predictor of perceived learning. It was found that learner-learner interaction played the least significant role in predicting both student satisfaction and perceived learning within online learning environments.

Language

English

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